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City receiving $34 million from feds and province for water and sewer line renewal

Thompson is getting more than $34 million from the federal and provincial governments to renew nearly 14 kilometres of water lines and 3.3 kilometres of wastewater lines over a five-year period.
A Google Earth Images shows water and wastewater lines in Thompson scheduled to be renewed over the
A Google Earth Images shows water and wastewater lines in Thompson scheduled to be renewed over the next five years with help from $34.4 million in combined funding from the federal and provincial governments.

Thompson is getting more than $34 million from the federal and provincial governments to renew nearly 14 kilometres of water lines and 3.3 kilometres of wastewater lines over a five-year period.

The funding from the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program (ICIP) green infrastructure stream was announced by Winnipeg South Centre Liberal MP Jim Carr and Manitoba Central Services Minister Reg Helwer on Aug, 13, two days before Prime Minister Justin Trudeau asked the governor-general to dissolve Parliament, triggering a federal election in September.

“This funding is another key example of what we can accomplish for our communities when all levels of government work together,” said Carr on behalf of the federal government, which is contributing $18.8 million towards the work.

Lines being replaced include those along Riverside Drive from Granite Crescent to Mystery Lake Road, Burntwood Drive, Princeton Drive, Station Road from Princeton to the industrial area, Centennial Drive East and West, Westwood Drive, Hayes Road, Wekusko Street and Wuskwatim Bay, said the City of Thompson. It will be co-ordinated by section so it is completed before overlapping road work to make sure both are completed as efficiently and cost-effectively as possible.

“Today's funding announcement for these vital infrastructure projects represents a lot of hard work and collaboration between Manitoba and our federal and municipal partners,” said Helwer.

The province is providing $15.6 million for the work.

“This grant didn’t fall into our laps overnight,” said Mayor Colleen Smook. “Much like our roadwork announcements [last] month, this grant took three years of extensive planning and difficult budget choices to prepare for it. Basic infrastructure like roads, water and sewer are the bedrock for our businesses and residents who who work hard to provide them. This second massive investment, from federal and provincial governments, recognizes our critical role in the north.”

The city’s cost for the project is $12.5 million.

Thompson is also receiving $33.3 million combined from the federal and provincial governments to renew all or part of 24 city roads that represent about 20 per cent of the city’s total road network. The city is contributing about $6.7 million to that work.

“These two announcements are first steps towards a new and sustainable future for Thompson,” Smook said. “We’re still working with our federal and provincial partners to do more for our residents and visitors who rely on us every day, in recreation, public safety and more.”